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Bringing bridges, subways to life

Local artists and government landscape architects have breathed new life into flyovers and subways in the city, tapping into characteristics of various communities.   The beautification works have also led to job creations, easing the pressure on the labour market due to the COVID-19 pandemic.   The subways close to Tung Chung Swimming Pool have been given a facelift since June, showcasing the beautiful and unique scenery of Lantau Island, such as Ngong Ping 360, the Big Buddha, Tung Chung Fort, Sunset Peak and Lantau Peak.   The exquisite creations belong to a group of artists who were born after 1990. They blanketed the subways with the island’s spectacular landscape. Rita Lau is one of them.   “I am a Tung Chung resident. So I know other Tung Chung residents, and their feelings and feedback,” Ms Lau said.   Local flair   The decoration not only promotes the beauty of Lantau, but also upgrades different parts of the subways with different colour schemes and images.   “W

CE explains dual nationality stance

(To watch the full media session with sign language interpretation, click here.)   Chief Executive Carrie Lam today said Chinese nationals who have dual nationality are not eligible for foreign consular protection in Hong Kong.   Mrs Lam made the statement ahead of this morning’s Executive Council meeting in response to media enquiries about visits by consuls to their nationals with dual nationality in the city.   She noted that people should refer to the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties for such matters.   “Where a person has dual nationality, which is accepted and recognised in some places, not all places - certainly not recognised in the Nationality Law of the People’s Republic of China - then if that particular person is in one of the places or countries that does not recognise dual nationality and possesses one of his national statuses, then he will not be eligible for this sort of consular protection, including consular visits.”   She added that the National People’s Congress Standing Committee in 1996 decided that those with dual nationalities will be regarded as Chinese nationals in Hong Kong, and would not be eligible for consular protection.    The Chief Executive also reiterated that the UK Government’s recent move to grant the right of abode to British National (Overseas) (BN(O)) passport holders has breached the understanding reached at the time of the Sino-British Joint Declaration.    “There was an exchange of memorandum between the two governments about how the holders of the BN(O) passports will be treated after 1997, and that is that the BN(O) passport is a travel document and is a proof of identity, and nothing else.   “It is not a form of nationality, and the UK Government has pledged that they will not grant the right of abode or nationality status to holders of the BN(O) passport. So, this understanding has now been breached.”
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